Orwell was a British journalist and author, who wrote two of the most famous novels of the 20th century
'Animal Farm' and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'.
Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair on 25 June 1903 in eastern India, the son of a British colonial civil servant. He was
educated in England and, after he left Eton, joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, then a British colony. He resigned
in 1927 and decided to become a writer. In 1928, he moved to Paris where lack of success as a writer forced him into a series
of menial jobs. He described his experiences in his first book, 'Down and Out in Paris and London', published in 1933. He took
the name George Orwell, shortly before its publication. This was followed by his first novel, 'Burmese Days', in 1934.
An anarchist in the late 1920s, by the 1930s he had begun to consider himself a socialist. In 1936, he was commissioned to
write an account of poverty among unemployed miners in northern England, which resulted in 'The Road to Wigan Pier'
(1937). Late in 1936, Orwell travelled to Spain to fight for the Republicans against Franco's Nationalists. He was forced to
flee in fear of his life from Soviet-backed communists who were suppressing revolutionary socialist dissenters. The
experience turned him into a lifelong anti-Stalinist.
Between 1941 and 1943, Orwell worked on propaganda for the BBC. In 1943, he became literary editor of the Tribune, a
weekly left-wing magazine. By now he was a prolific journalist, writing articles, reviews and books.
In 1945, Orwell's 'Animal Farm' was published. A political fable set in a farmyard but based on Stalin's betrayal of the
Russian Revolution, it made Orwell's name and ensured he was financially comfortable for the first time in his life.
'Nineteen Eighty-Four' was published four years later. Set in an imaginary totalitarian future, the book made a deep
impression, with its title and many phrases - such as 'Big Brother is watching you', 'newspeak' and 'doublethink' - entering
popular use. By now Orwell's health was deteriorating and he died of tuberculosis on 21 January 1950.
In a time of deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.
He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls
the past.
War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.
The most effective way to destroy people is to deny and obliterate their own
understanding of their history.
If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.
The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to
man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.
Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind
simultaneously, and accepting both of them.
Until they became conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled
they cannot become conscious.
We shall squeeze you empty and then we shall fill you with ourselves.
There was truth and there was untruth, and if you clung to the truth even against the
whole world, you were not mad.
Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
If you kept the small rules, you could break the big ones.

All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who
are not fighting.
We do not merely destroy our enemies; we change them.
Of pain you could wish only one thing: that it should stop. Nothing in the world was so bad as
physical pain. In the face of pain there are no heroes.
One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes
the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship.
The quickest way of ending a war is to lose it.
Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else.
To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle.
Political language. . . is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable,
and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind.
At age 50, every man has the face he deserves.
We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence
on those who would do us harm.
Enlightened people seldom or never possess a sense of responsibility.
We are all capable of believing things which we know to be untrue, and then, when
we are finally proved wrong, impudently twisting the facts so as to show that we were
right.
Every war when it comes, or before it comes, is represented not as a war but as an act
of self-defense against a homicidal maniac.